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How to break your shoulder.
#1
First find a 4ft Drop off

Step 1: Do not bother looking or studying the landing area.

Step 2: Go to slow so you land hard

Step 3: Land off camber

Step 4: Allow your front wheel to drift away from underneath you due to landing off camber

Step 5: Continue to travel towards the ground

Step 6: Impact

Step 7: Slide uncontrolled on dusty, rock infested soil for a good 4m

Step 8: Stand up, ignore pain/weird clicking noise from shoulder and continue to ride another 5 miles

Step 9: Finish ride unable to move arm and travel to Hospital

What did i learn from this mistake?

Always Study the landing, look for roots/rocks or any obstacles, makes sure the landing is not off camber or if it is remember to compensate for this.

Check your run up, make sure it is long enough and easy enough so you can be calm and thinking clearly on take off.

Mark your take off, this is so that you take off on the right trajectory to land on your designated landing area, most drop offs you cannot see your landing on the run up so this is why this is very important.

Carry enough speed so that you do not drop like a stone, the faster you go the softer the landing will be, but if you go to fast you will risk the chance of overshooting your landing, e.g miss the landing ramp and land on the flat, oww.

This is what i learnt from my mistake, im now much more cautious before i go off a drop off (but ill still go off them)

Russ
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#2
Also if in doubt, leave it till the end of a ride or until you are fully warmed up.

Largish drop offs 1 meter and above try and land on a transition, because landing to flat is not good for you or your bike. Most importantly RELAX and flow.

Practice technique on small sets of steps (no more than 2 high)
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#3
Haha, in 1994 I fractured my shoulder blade doing something pretty similar. Sadly my drop was a good 6 foot but to a flat landing :o More like a mini cliff really! Me and my brother spent the day wondering if you could make it... Then i stumped up the courage to throw myself off it. Needless to say the flat landing on a 1992 Trek 820 rigid MTB wasn't kind, the bike was pretty bent and i was worse. I was 18 at the time and right in the middle of my A levels, was my right shoulder too and most of my exams were essay based. Ended up having to lie in bed on pain killers dictating to teachers my essays in my bedroom. They all came out a bit weird and unsurprisingly i pretty much failed my exams. We still talk about the drop today as my mum went absolutely mental when my brother eventually turned up with her. I was still sat at the bottom in a fair amount of pain next to a very sick bike!

Consequently i didn't get into Uni but spent 6 years traveling the world teaching windsurfing and generally having the time of my life... Funny how things turn out...
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#4
I reckon jim can relate to steps 1-6
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