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How to lube your chain
#1
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://enduro-mtb.com/en/how-to-lube-your-chain-right/">http://enduro-mtb.com/en/how-to-lube-your-chain-right/</a><!-- m -->

Fan of the deep clean method myself.
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#2
Lube each individual chain link? Sod that, would take ages! I just wizz the chain round while squirting with lube. I hardly ever wipe off the excess, wonder if this can contribute to the chain not lasting 3 months?! Mine is knackered becaused it's stretched though, can't imagine wiping off the excess would stop that. Deep cleaning (leaving submerged in GT85 etc) is a bad idea, i've tried rescuing old chains before that way and always ended up with siezed links. Leaving in a bowl of engine oil worked once though Wink
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#3
Andy, on chain "stretch" from Sheldon Brown:
Riders often speak of "chain stretch," a technically misleading and incorrect term. Chains do not stretch, in the dictionary sense, by elongating the metal by tension. Chains lengthen because their hinge pins and sleeves wear. Chain wear is caused almost exclusively by road grit that enters the chain when it is oiled. Grit adheres to the outside of chains in the ugly black stuff that can get on one's leg, but external grime has little functional effect, being on the outside where it does the chain no harm.
The black stuff is oil colored by steel wear particles, nearly all of which come from pin and sleeve wear, the wear that causes pitch elongation. The rate of wear is dependent primarily on how clean the chain is internally rather than visible external cleanliness that gets the most attention.
Only when a dirty chain is oiled, or has excessive oil on it, can this grit move inside to cause damage. Commercial abrasive grinding paste is made of oil and silicon dioxide (sand) and silicon carbide (sand). You couldn't do it better if you tried to destroy a chain, than to oil it when dirty.
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#4
^^^^^ Nice post 8-)

I've found adapting lube product between wet a dry seasons works well and in the winter giving the cassette, chain etc a good light spray (mobi washer is good for this) to remove fresh grime. A wipe off and then apply lube. Seems to be keeping nice a shiny. Smile
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#5
Yankee Wrote:Andy, on chain "stretch" from Sheldon Brown:
Riders often speak of "chain stretch," a technically misleading and incorrect term. Chains do not stretch, in the dictionary sense, by elongating the metal by tension. Chains lengthen because their hinge pins and sleeves wear. Chain wear is caused almost exclusively by road grit that enters the chain when it is oiled. Grit adheres to the outside of chains in the ugly black stuff that can get on one's leg, but external grime has little functional effect, being on the outside where it does the chain no harm.
The black stuff is oil colored by steel wear particles, nearly all of which come from pin and sleeve wear, the wear that causes pitch elongation. The rate of wear is dependent primarily on how clean the chain is internally rather than visible external cleanliness that gets the most attention.
Only when a dirty chain is oiled, or has excessive oil on it, can this grit move inside to cause damage. Commercial abrasive grinding paste is made of oil and silicon dioxide (sand) and silicon carbide (sand). You couldn't do it better if you tried to destroy a chain, than to oil it when dirty.
Thanks for that. I almost always just spray the bike down, dry the chain with a rag then put loads of lube on and hang bike up till next ride, and often don't wash after every ride and just re lube the chain! Hardly surprising the current chain and cassette are completely fooked after 3 months with the weather and trail conditions it's been subjected to! Next drivetrain i will lick clean after every ride! Just hope i don't have to replace the OneUp first gear extender this time!
How do people clean their chain? That article said that chain baths arent a good idea as they remove the oil from the pins and sleeves.
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#6
I use this:

resim

With "Elbow Grease" degreaser...

But that article suggests not to...

Ooooops... Every day is a school day
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#7
my 2 pence, water and oil don't mix, if the chain is at all wet when lubricant is added it will just sit on top of the water and not really do much.
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#8
Oh and if the chain is looking really manky i spray WD40 into a rag to clean it!
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