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Two new chains wear slower than one?
#1
I need new chain wheels, chain, and rear cassette. It is for daily commutes of 4 miles each way minimum. The current set of chainwheels, chain, and cassette are around 14 months old, and the chain has been slipping quite badly and I need to be careful when pushing off from a standstill to avoid chain slip (luckily found an old middle chain ring not quite so worn to reduce chain slip temporarily).

When I buy the new set of chainwheels (or a whole new crankset actually, is cheaper) chain and cassette, I'm considering buying a pair of chains and swapping them every week or so. The idea based on the theory that a worn chain wears the chainwheels and cassette faster than a new chain, therefor two new chains will wear them even slower Idea
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#2
Nope, swapping between two chains won't make any difference. Just look after the chain, cleaning and lubing regularly remembering to remove the excess lube and change the chain once it reaches between .75 and 1% wear. This is what i've been told and will do with the current new drivetrain and apparently the cassette and chainrings will last 2 or 3 years.
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#3
14 months or so is pretty rapid wear. My commuter is still on a 5 year old drivetrain and even that is bodged so that a 8 speed shifter fits a 9 speed block. When it comes to replacing it all i'll set it up correctly with a 8 speed but the bloody thing refuses to die so I'm stuck with it as it is for now 'cos i'm so tight. Also, get a steel cassette, it's a commuter. I've got a steel cassette on all my bikes (MTB and road) and the drivetrains last for ages, i'm convinced it's the rubbish alloy cassettes that cause major wear to all of the components.
Keep it foolish...
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#4
I have a steel cassette, and it's not too bad, at least compared with the chain ring I've swapped out with vampire teeth. The chain is so worn and loose it sometimes falls onto the granny ring if I go to lowest gear on rear cassette.

Could be about time to invest in a chain wear measuring device...

What chainset upfront are you running? I've been using a Shimano Deore M590 9 Speed Triple Chainset but am not impressed with how the middle ring has worn so much... but maybe my poor chain maintenance schedule over the Winter... Or maybe 48-36-26 + roadie cassette was too much gears for a mountain bike (despite the lack of big hills around Thanet) and going for 44-32-22 + roadie cassette may give me more usage of the big ring and take some stress off the middle... ponder ponder..
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#5
The chainrings are so worn because the chain is so knackered. Replace the chain when it gets to .75% and it'll last a lot longer.
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#6
Thinking about it from a mileage perspective it may not be so bad. I've done 864 miles since 10th March this year, but that's definitely a high point over the past year or so but it gives the idea that I've probably got a fairly decent mileage out of it.

I think I will still try using two chains, maybe swap them once a month. Will avoid washing out the internal factory lube in the chains this time too, and get a chain wear measuring tool, and see how things go in comparison.
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#7
sirromj Wrote:Thinking about it from a mileage perspective it may not be so bad. I've done 864 miles since 10th March this year, but that's definitely a high point over the past year or so but it gives the idea that I've probably got a fairly decent mileage out of it.

I think I will still try using two chains, maybe swap them once a month. Will avoid washing out the internal factory lube in the chains this time too, and get a chain wear measuring tool, and see how things go in comparison.
There's no point keep swapping between the 2, just moniter the wear and change when it's at .75%.
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#8
When swapping at 0.75%, how many chains until the cassette and chainrings are too worn to accept a new chain?
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#9
sirromj Wrote:When swapping at 0.75%, how many chains until the cassette and chainrings are too worn to accept a new chain?
Tinc said his cassette is about 3 years old.
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#10
So you doing nearly 900 miles in just over a month and you're worried that your chain and rings have worn out after 14 months.....seriously
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