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Polarised Cycling Glasses
#1
Does such a thing exist?..........

Im filling out my fantasy "I want" birthday list and I want a pair of cycling glasses that are clear or yellow, but get darker in bright light.

In my earlier trip to Afan this year, it was mega bright and sunny, so had sunglasses on, enter the dark shaded woods and I couldnt see a thing either due to wearing sunglasses in the relative dark and eyesight adjusting to darkness.

Is the such sports glasses which are very light tinted or clear, but get darker when out in the nice sunshine?

Im sure there are........ what do you know?
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#2
Specialized do some. Cant remember what their system is called but Russ has a pair which i had a try of months ago and it changed pretty quickly, and they arent THAT expensive either.
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#3
i think the thread title should be Photocromic cycling glasses, as polarised glasses are used to reduce the glare from relections on water, glass fog etc.

if you want glasses that alter there optical density, eg they let less light through when it's sunny and more when it's not, then there are loads out there

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.oakley.com/innovation/optical_superiority/photochromic">http://www.oakley.com/innovation/optica ... otochromic</a><!-- m -->
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#4
I think you need to be careful in how long it takes photochromic lenses to change. IIRC it can take a number of seconds to change from dark to light which if you're going for it might not be quick enough.  I'd try some first as I also think they are quite expensive.  I've got some polarising oakleys which are great in strong sunlight/snow as they cut out glare but as soon as I go into anywhere shaded they're not much good    
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#5
Im old fashioned and know them as polaroid/polarising glasses - but yes, Oakleys version of Polariszed cuts out glare (Ive had several pairs of Oakleys with that)

To confirm, I need a quick changing lens which goes from pratically clear to tinted/darker fairly quickly.

Probably not much call at this time of year or winter, but while Im being asked for ideas, might aswell plan ahead!
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#6
What you want is what specialized call Adapatalite, ive got a pair and wear them in all lighting except totally dark! Wouldnt ride without them, they do adapt fast enough for me and ive never had a problem.

The yellow tint is for offroad, the red is for roadies.

I got mine for £50 in a sale, they are all normally £80, many different designs just go on the Specialized site or google them.

You can get the Oakley jawbone in light changing but they are £220, you can get them in Polarized to.
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#7
I tried on some really nice fitting chromatic shades at the show,
Made by "Jublo" or something, they were the Intense model I think. About £80 but lovely, they're on my crimbo list already ;D
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#8
&quot;BMJBOY&quot; Wrote:Im old fashioned and know them as polaroid/polarising glasses - but yes, Oakleys version of Polariszed cuts out glare (Ive had several pairs of Oakleys with that)

To confirm, I need a quick changing lens which goes from pratically clear to tinted/darker fairly quickly.

Probably not much call at this time of year or winter, but while Im being asked for ideas, might aswell plan ahead!

Not wanting to pick nits, but Polarising and Photochromatic lenses are two very different things.

Polarizing lenses reduce glare from horizontal surfaces, they look like sunglasses should look (dark all the time) and this tint does not react in any way to ambient light. They are usually available in LTFs between 25% and 12% (this is the amount of light able to pass through the lens, too little and you will get lost in the trees).

Photochromic, Photochromatic, Transitions, Reactolite, Adaptalite are all different company's versions of the same thing - lenses that go dark in the sun. Generally they are relatively light to begin with and drop to around 30% LTF in direct sunlight. They are never as dark as a dedicated sunglass lens. They also work better in colder weather and as it is UV light that makes them work, not just 'brightness' are good for skiing but bad for driving (windscreen reduces UV light).

In the real world, get what feels best for you. Don't be tempted by a very dark tint, yes you can look like Bono, but he's a plum and rarely rides through dappled forest light. Reacting lenses are best (under any brandname) as they do adapt very efficiently, but not as rapidly as your eyes. Even the best reacting lens will take at least 20 seconds to lose much tint colour, your eyes will adapt in a quarter of that time.

Buzz's Adaptalites from Spesh always get well rated +1 to them.
All UK sold sunglasses and tinted lenses are legally required to have full, 100% UV protection, even £10 from Topman, don't pay more 'cos they say they have 'better' UV filtering, better than 100%?

This is another option...
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Model...elID=26715 fiddly to change tho...
Keep it foolish...
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#9
I just recall being in total darkness when going into dense woodland after a bright sunny fireroad - cant keep changing lenses all the time, so looking for a variable lens solution.

I'll keep an eye out for adaptalites I think.

Are the lenses glass does anyone know? - I dont want to shell out £50+ and have them scratched by mud/grit on the first ride.

All my previous glasses end up scratched if you get a dollop of mud on them and then subsequently scratches the lens upon removal/wiping to see down the trail.
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#10
sports spex are never glass, they will shatter in your face when you fall (so they are not available). Generally Polycarbonate or a proprietary brand name of similar materiaL. light, safe and generally hardcoated for scratch resistance. nothing is scratch proof. Oakleys seem quite resistant tho, but super expensive. Rayban make glass lenses still, but they are not sports styled and I would never wear glass on principle due to potential for breakage.
Keep it foolish...
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