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Bike Maintenance Training/Courses
#1
I'm rubbish at maintaining my bike and if anything goes wrong Im shagged as to how to fix it, other than take it to a lbs. Now i know some jobs need professional but there are some things I should be able to do myself. My limit is changing cables so far!

Question is do you think a course would be a good idea and good way to spend my cash or should I learn as things break? Or is there any of you who would show me the ropes?
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#2
Get an old bike - build it from scratch - like I did.....

I now know a lot about building and maintaining.

Theres nothing out there that Youtube wont show you!!  Wink
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#3
I was thinking of buying an old bike, stripping it then rebuilding it but not seen one new enough to then transfer the practice to my bike. The reason I ask is because I've ordered some pedals and need to learn how to fit them! I want to try convert to a two ring set up myself but am not confident enough to give it a go just yet. Tongue
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#4
The DIY approach is good, the only draw back is getting the right tools, I have most of them now, and do work on about 4 other peoples bikes.

The hardest thing is setting up the gears, the rest is easy!!
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#5
"mashley" Wrote:I was thinking of buying an old bike, stripping it then rebuilding it but not seen one new enough to then transfer the practice to my bike. The reason I ask is because I've ordered some pedals and need to learn how to fit them! I want to try convert to a two ring set up myself but am not confident enough to give it a go just yet. Tongue
Dose your bike have external bearings, that being bearings that screw in and you can see them butted up against the BB shell, or when you look down from the top, can you see the axle coming out either side? If the latter (which i suspect it is), you will need an internal BB tool and a crank puller. Basically you just remove the nut in the centre of the drive side crank, then screw in the crank puller and wind in the center bolt with an allen key which pulls the chainset off. You can then undoo the 4 allen bolts holding the middle and outer rings on and just replace the outer with the bash. If you want a chain device too the drive side BB cup must have a lip on the outside otherwise it will not fit. All you need to do is unscrew the BB cup, then fit the chain device between the BB shell and cup.  Simples Smile

I think a course would be a waste of money, you can learn everything there is to know by just trying everything yourself first. Click on the Park Tool link in my sig which should tell you everything you need to know right up to wheel building. Basically as long as you have all the right tools, it's a piece of cake.
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#6
External BB is the easiest invention for a bike i a long time - SO EASY - I can do it.

All you need is the right tool and bobs your uncle - just a matter of unscrewing.
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#7
"BMJBOY" Wrote:External BB is the easiest invention for a bike i a long time - SO EASY - I can do it.

All you need is the right tool and bobs your uncle - just a matter of unscrewing.


Only if you remember the drive side reverse thread!!
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#8
Mashley am i right in thinking your in Ashford (think we met the other day when i gave Steve a lift home). If so i probably have the tools you need depending on what kit you have on your bike (shimano and truvativ no worries). Im no pro but anything drivetrain or brakes related im normally ok on so if you need a hand id be happy to bring round the workstand and tools etc if you need a hand.

If your really set on a course Downland cycles in canterbury do some good courses.
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#9
"Longjon" Wrote:Only if you remember the drive side reverse thread!!

LOL yes, stripped a stub axle nut on my race car many years ago due to forgetting/not realising/not being told that one side was RH thread, one side was LH thread.... at least it was the nut and not the stub axle!
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#10
"Si.Ozzy" Wrote:Mashley am i right in thinking your in Ashford (think we met the other day when i gave Steve a lift home). If so i probably have the tools you need depending on what kit you have on your bike (shimano and truvativ no worries). Im no pro but anything drivetrain or brakes related im normally ok on so if you need a hand id be happy to bring round the workstand and tools etc if you need a hand.

If your really set on a course Downland cycles in canterbury do some good courses.

Hi, yeah im in Ashford. ive not bought the gear yet. I dont really know what i need to buy. It'll be the first project ive undertaken on my bike and dont really know where to start!?

Andy, your message confused me even more  Tongue lol
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