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Balls
#1
Morning All

I had some play in my rear axle which I stripped out today.  In the process I discovered that 4 of the ball bearings in the free wheel side have become lumpy & mishapen so will need to be replaced.  The hub in a Shimano XT which IIRC has 9mm balls, do they have to be specifically Shiman/bike ones or will just a generic ball do?
Ride the Spiral to the end
It takes us to where no ones been
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#2
anyones as long as they are the right side... Kent Bearing on the Medway City Estate are your best bet locally... just take a "good" old one with you so they can measure it up
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#3
Cool, will head down there now and pick up some new ones Smile
Ride the Spiral to the end
It takes us to where no ones been
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#4
not sure if its the same size as 9mm seems quite big, but i got a bunch of balls in cages from Halfords for a couple of quid recently. balls are balls.
Keep it foolish...
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#5
Does sound big, I would have thought more like 4mm ish?
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#6
A Shimano rear hub will have 9x1/4" loose balls, this is roughly 6mm (6.35mm Wink), but you'll not buy 6mm balls from a cycle shop, just 1/4" or 1/8" normally.  There are other size & one size in particular is very close, being 7/32", but these are pretty much exclusively used in Campag hubs, so you'll not get them unless you specifically ask for them.
If you can fit 12 bearings in then you've got the wrong ones!

If you have loose bearings then replace with loose bearings.  Caged bearings are normally used to allow the manufacturer to use less balls per joint.   They are frequently lower quality & may be odd sizes as they are specifically made to fit in the cage.  Loose bearings are much more efficient, wear slower, are able to be adjusted more finely and operate smoother.

Do not be tempted to just replace the damaged ones; replace them all with new bearings bought from the same place at the same time.  Any good LBS will tell you they don't sell singles & this is why......
Bearings carry tiny manufacturing variations in size per batch & mixing them means that you could easily end up with "different" sizes.  This increases to the load on the "big" ones & usually wears the seat out as well as the new bearings in no time Sad
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#7
Tinc has it spot on, also check the cones and hub for pitting. 9mm would be the axle diameter  Wink
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#8
"Tinc" Wrote:A Shimano rear hub will have 9x1/4" loose balls, this is roughly 6mm (6.35mm Wink), but you'll not buy 6mm balls from a cycle shop, just 1/4" or 1/8" normally.  There are other size & one size in particular is very close, being 7/32", but these are pretty much exclusively used in Campag hubs, so you'll not get them unless you specifically ask for them.
If you can fit 12 bearings in then you've got the wrong ones!

If you have loose bearings then replace with loose bearings.  Caged bearings are normally used to allow the manufacturer to use less balls per joint.   They are frequently lower quality & may be odd sizes as they are specifically made to fit in the cage.  Loose bearings are much more efficient, wear slower, are able to be adjusted more finely and operate smoother.

Do not be tempted to just replace the damaged ones; replace them all with new bearings bought from the same place at the same time.  Any good LBS will tell you they don't sell singles & this is why......
Bearings carry tiny manufacturing variations in size per batch & mixing them means that you could easily end up with "different" sizes.  This increases to the load on the "big" ones & usually wears the seat out as well as the new bearings in no time Sad

A jolly good read that....     Smile
Mei securis turpe meus vox<br />            
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#9
Tinc's do you eat bike books for dinner ? :o Every time a question comes up i learn something new from you !
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#10
Thanks to Kent Bearings (Neptune Close, Medway City Estate) I have a shiney new set of balls  ;D  

You were right with 9 1/4" and I got a set of 9 to replace the whole side.  I've cleaned all the glop out of the cone and cone race which seem to be ok so hopefully this should sort out my flappy rear end.

Cheers for advice fella's Smile
Ride the Spiral to the end
It takes us to where no ones been
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