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Cornering (and use of the Front Brake)
#41
weight inside bar and outside foot

had a session with a skills guy in france who recommended counter steering a bit on big berms - does lay the bike over and works on big berms where slow in and fast out etc - need some big smooth berms to try it out on
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#42
I generally push down on the inside and lift up on outside. Feels a bit like having power steering and really helps on really tight twisty trails. Your local trail you spoke of above sounds perfect to practice on, so just session that and time yourself. There is a really sweet twisty trail in my local woods which is absolutely perfect to practice this, we must have done it 20 times on Friday trying to do the whole run without braking, so if you ever find yourself on a Blean Wednesday ride i'll show it to you Wink
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#43
"mudhound" Wrote:weight inside bar and outside foot

had a session with a skills guy in france who recommended counter steering a bit on big berms - does lay the bike over and works on big berms where slow in and fast out etc - need some big smooth berms to try it out on

Totally agree.

Although it sounds difficult, do everything you can not to touch the brakes in a corner. If you have to brake, check your speed with the rear.

As soon as you hit the brakes at all your body posistion will change, you will break grip and lose your line.

Adjust your speed before you turn, then turn in with your inside foot high, outside low ( unless its a berm then personally I would keep feet level but there are different arguements here! ).

When you get some confidence push the bike into the turn as if you are pumping it - this generates both speed and grip.

Are there any specific corners your struggling more with, i.e. Berms, Off Camber, Open, Tight, Loose etc?
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#44
Hi Jam Roll
Things have improved a lot in the past 3 months actually. But my issues are mainly on flat corners and off camber and the fact i dont lean the bike enough is obviously to blame. I seem to have overcome my tendancy to brake in corners though.
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#45
There is a very good section on flat land turns in the DVD 'Fluidride: like a pro'.
It reinforces much of what has been advised in this thread with some excellent clear video sections and slow-motion skills shots. It has helped me a lot to develop confidence with faster, more controlled cornering.
Well its given me a start anyway....... Undecided
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#46
There is also a very good guide in the skills section in last issue of imbikemag. Is about as comprehensive as you can get and has helped my cornering a lot.
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#47
"Blackers" Wrote:Hi Jam Roll
Things have improved a lot in the past 3 months actually. But my issues are mainly on flat corners and off camber and the fact i dont lean the bike enough is obviously to blame. I seem to have overcome my tendancy to brake in corners though.

You've hit the nail on the head - its all about confidence really.

You need to move the bike under you but try to keep your body weight central. Think about weighting the pedals and pushing the tyres into the ground. Just takes practive - try to get yourself on some DH runs and session the corners, you might find it helps.
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