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Tubes or Tubeless Poll!
#21
tried to put trailraker on this morning tubeless, co2 worked well to get it seated. then I kept pumping to make sure it was seated. wasn't concentrating on pressure and the tyre exploded off rim. I was doing it in my shed and the bang was insane !!, ears still ringing now. completely dazed for a while. tyre was fine but some how it has put a slight wobble in my wheel. I've never had the rim untrue since I bought it. Shows how violently the tyre came off.

lesson learnt and won't do that again !!
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#22
I changed from Rubber Queens to Panaracer Muds. As always one changes really easily but the other needed the assistance of a high pressure pump at the garage. All done now without too much hassle.  ;D
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#23
Ive gone back to tubes. Had enough of burping rims and messy tyre changes and puncture repairs.
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#24
Here's my ghetto tubeless fitting guide, there's plenty on line and youtube-able already, but this works for me.

1 - If your wheel has a rim strip of some variety, it might not be airtight if it's not a special one. If it doesn't look very airtight, run a strip of electrical tape round the circumference of the rim, sealing the rim tape against the rim. If you've got heavy gaffer tape then all the better, get busy.

2 - Cut the valve from a Presta tube (make sure it has the little locking nut). Tidy the arse end of the valve so that there is a just enough rubber at the bottom that it cannot fall through the valve hole in the rim, but no more than necessary.

3 - Put a drop of sealant around the valve hole in the rim and then push the trimmed valve into the hole and do the nut up tight (finger tight). You should now have a nice clean rim (!), taped and airtight.

4 - Make up some slightly soapy water, to the same ratio you'd use if you were washing up. Brush (or slop) the fairy solution onto the rim, you don't need loads, just make it moist.

5 - Mount one side of the tyre like usual, if you can then try to press this side entirely home against the bead, make sure that the tyre fits snuggly between the arse end of the valve and the rim.

6 - Starting at the valve, fit the second side of the tyre. Again, make sure the tyre drops between the valve and the rim correctly. You'll not be able to ease this side onto the bead so don't bother trying. Leave about 6" of tyre unfitted directly opposite the valve.

7 - Hang the wheel on something, suspend it in the forks or off a door handle if necessary. Now it's hanging and you're feeling brave, add the sealant. I'd use a couple of scoops , more is better than less. and then pop the last 6" of tyre on.

8 - Carefully rehang the wheel so that the valve is now at the bottom. Double check that the tyre is snug twixt valve and rim. Have you got a track pump? Have you got a CO2 canister? CO2 makes this bit easier, but even after blasting in a ton of high pressure CO2 you'll still need to whack a track pump on to finish the job. The next bit may well end in tears so have a cup of tea and a biscuit before you start.

9 - Mercilessly blast CO2 / air from track pump into your tyre. Do Not Stop! Keep on pumping like you're punishing Vanessa Feltz. Eventually you'll hear a sharp crack, this is either your spleen rupturing (keep pumping) or the tyre seating onto the bead (keep pumping) as you want to hear both sides of the tyre seat so that's two sharp cracks.

10 - Even after the bead is seated air will continue to escape. You'll hear it and see bubbles from your fairy fluid, turn the wheel and sloosh it about a bit so that the sealant can flow into the leak.

11 - Have a mojito, you deserve one.

Disclaimer

Some tyres just don't want to know
Some rims are not interested
No CO2 canister? Compressor / petrol station airline but you'll need a little brass adaptor
Some say CO2 makes sealant 'go off' faster. Let it out after you're happy everything is sealed if you're worried, then top up with compressor / track pump.
Mojito is non-negotiable

Good Luck
Keep it foolish...
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#25
"alkali" Wrote:Here's my ghetto tubeless fitting guide, there's plenty on line and youtube-able already, but this works for me.

1 - If your wheel has a rim strip of some variety, it might not be airtight if it's not a special one. If it doesn't look very airtight, run a strip of electrical tape round the circumference of the rim, sealing the rim tape against the rim. If you've got heavy gaffer tape then all the better, get busy.

2 - Cut the valve from a Presta tube (make sure it has the little locking nut). Tidy the arse end of the valve so that there is a just enough rubber at the bottom that it cannot fall through the valve hole in the rim, but no more than necessary.

3 - Put a drop of sealant around the valve hole in the rim and then push the trimmed valve into the hole and do the nut up tight (finger tight). You should now have a nice clean rim (!), taped and airtight.

4 - Make up some slightly soapy water, to the same ratio you'd use if you were washing up. Brush (or slop) the fairy solution onto the rim, you don't need loads, just make it moist.

5 - Mount one side of the tyre like usual, if you can then try to press this side entirely home against the bead, make sure that the tyre fits snuggly between the arse end of the valve and the rim.

6 - Starting at the valve, fit the second side of the tyre. Again, make sure the tyre drops between the valve and the rim correctly. You'll not be able to ease this side onto the bead so don't bother trying. Leave about 6" of tyre unfitted directly opposite the valve.

7 - Hang the wheel on something, suspend it in the forks or off a door handle if necessary. Now it's hanging and you're feeling brave, add the sealant. I'd use a couple of scoops , more is better than less. and then pop the last 6" of tyre on.

8 - Carefully rehang the wheel so that the valve is now at the bottom. Double check that the tyre is snug twixt valve and rim. Have you got a track pump? Have you got a CO2 canister? CO2 makes this bit easier, but even after blasting in a ton of high pressure CO2 you'll still need to whack a track pump on to finish the job. The next bit may well end in tears so have a cup of tea and a biscuit before you start.

9 - Mercilessly blast CO2 / air from track pump into your tyre. Do Not Stop! Keep on pumping like you're punishing Vanessa Feltz. Eventually you'll hear a sharp crack, this is either your spleen rupturing (keep pumping) or the tyre seating onto the bead (keep pumping) as you want to hear both sides of the tyre seat so that's two sharp cracks.

10 - Even after the bead is seated air will continue to escape. You'll hear it and see bubbles from your fairy fluid, turn the wheel and sloosh it about a bit so that the sealant can flow into the leak.

11 - Have a mojito, you deserve one.

Disclaimer

Some tyres just don't want to know
Some rims are not interested
No CO2 canister? Compressor / petrol station airline but you'll need a little brass adaptor
Some say CO2 makes sealant 'go off' faster. Let it out after you're happy everything is sealed if you're worried, then top up with compressor / track pump.
Mojito is non-negotiable

Good Luck


Man, i think that is probably the best guide I have ever read, for anything, ever Big Grin
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