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Grand Prix The Killer Years
#1
Did anyone watch Grand Prix the killer years on BBC last week? I watched on Iplayer last night. It was the most amazing thought provoking documentary I've ever seen. Some of the attitudes and pictures they showed were just truely horrific. And not to mention in an era were 57 drivers died in 12 years, 9 out of 10 of those through fire, who the hell thought it would be a good idea to build a car out of magnesium. I don't think Graham Chapman came out of the programme particularly well, "make it lighter, make it lighter". Some very good interviews.

Watching David Purley trying to rescue his mate towards the end is quite possibly the saddest 3-4 minutes of video I have ever seen.

Quite a few of you have an interest in motor racing and especially F1, I urge you to watch it. Unbelievable.

Unfortunately it stopped on iplayer last night but you can watch it on youtube (in 4 parts) or prob download if you are that way inclined.




I've just read the following on wiki about the David Purley's actions....

"On the 8th lap of the race, a suspected tyre failure caused Williamson's car to pitch into the barriers at high speed, and be catapulted 300 yards (275 m) across the track, eventually coming to rest upside down against the barriers on the other side. The petrol tank had ignited while being scraped along the track, and the car caught fire. Williamson had not been seriously injured by the impact, but was trapped in the car. The race was not stopped and continued with a local yellow at the scene, a fact which would become significant over the next few minutes.

Fellow driver David Purley almost immediately pulled his car over on the opposite side of the track, then ran across the live racetrack to assist him. Williamson was heard shouting to Purley to get him out of the car as Purley tried in vain to turn the car upright. There appeared to have been ample time to right the car and pull Williamson out, but as desperately as he tried, Purley was unable to do it by himself, and the marshals, who were not wearing flame retardant overalls, were unable to help due to the intense heat.
Race control assumed that it was Purley's car that had crashed and that the driver had escaped unharmed. Many drivers who saw Purley waving them down to stop assumed that he was trying to put a fire out from his own car, after having safely exited it, and thus did not know that a second driver had been involved. As a result the race continued at full pace while Purley desperately tried to save the life of Williamson.

There was only a single fire extinguisher in the area, and it was not enough to put out the fire. With the car still burning upside-down, the situation became hopeless, and the distraught Purley was led away by a marshal. Some spectators, appalled at Williamson's plight, tried to breach the safety fences in order to assist Williamson, but were pushed back by track security staff with dogs.

With the race still on, it took some eight minutes for a fire truck to completely travel around the circuit with the flow of race traffic. By the time the car was eventually righted, and the fire extinguished, Williamson had died of asphyxiation. A blanket was thrown over the burnt-out wreck with Williamson still inside, and the race carried on.

Purley was awarded the George Medal for his brave actions in trying to save his fellow sportsman."
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#2
Not seen it although did watch the recent one on Graham Hill which was brilliant.

Ive only read small bits about what went on back then and your last sentance is enough to make me not want to watch it. The concept of not having sufficient safety gear for the marshalls etc after the first death is bad enough but for it to be so "acceptable" that a death was just a minor blip and the race must go on just fills me with rage!
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#3
Watch it. It wasn't all really bad. It was primarily the story of how Jackie Stewart was influential in getting safety improved and how they set up the grand prix drivers association. How they striked at some races they felt were unsafe.
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#4
It's ridiculous the risks the drivers took back then! Such a shame that it took the death of Senna to make them really think about safety and do something about it. I didn't catch it on the iplayer, any idea where i can download it from?
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#5
1: he said in his post where to get it

2: it annoys me that most people only remember Sennas death and forget about Ratzenburger who died the day before at the same GP...
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#6
"Breezer" Wrote:1: he said in his post where to get it

2: it annoys me that most people only remember Sennas death and forget about Ratzenburger who died the day before at the same GP...

Yeah i was gonna mention Ratzenburger too but only F1 geeks like us would remember him. Was a tragic weekend Sad I didn't actually watch the race as we were out for the day but i remember being in tears when my Dad told me about it.

Oh and youtube has been a bit slow for me lately so i would rather download it, so just want to know the best place to download it from.
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#7
"Treehugger" Wrote:Yeah i was gonna mention Ratzenburger too but only F1 geeks like us would remember him. Was a tragic weekend Sad I didn't actually watch the race as we were out for the day but i remember being in tears when my Dad told me about it.

Oh and youtube has been a bit slow for me lately so i would rather download it, so just want to know the best place to download it from.

safety really improved in mid eighties - loads of circuit and spectator safety issues, Group B got shelved

was Senna death followed by more cockpit and neckbrace safety
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#8
Higher cockpit sides iirc although he still would have gone even with them as they are now as the bit of suspension pierced the upper part of his helmet
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#9
Grand prix is boring.
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#10
"mashley" Wrote:Grand prix is boring.

+1
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