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Garmin Edge 705 - general info
#1
Here are some findings from learning to plot routes and navigate them using my Garmin.  These are just my thoughts – I am sharing the best way that I have found to do this so any corrections, suggestions or other thoughts are welcome.  I hope summarising them is useful to newer Garmin users or those that feel they aren’t getting the most from their devices.  All of this relates to the Garmin Edge 705 - a quirky unit that has taken a bit of getting used to.  It’d be nice to keep this thread on topic as a FAQ type information source rather than a debate on whether this or any other unit are any good.  I really like mine but appreciate its frustrations and limitations may mean it is not for everyone.  I will probably update this first draft based on feedback and future learnings


1) Tracks and routes:

A route is something that can be plotted on your PC using software such as mapsource etc and is generally saved as a .GPX file.  You are given turn by turn directions

When you log a ride that you have done the file is stored as a track.  This is like a trail of breadcrumbs (trackpoints) over the paths you have ridden on.  This is saved by the Garmin unit as a .TCX file.  You can also plot a track on your PC in a similar way to plotting a route.

When it comes to following your route or track, your Garmin will follow a TCX exactly as it written, point by point.  A pink line is overlaid on the path you should be following and the unit will bleep to warn you when you are more than a certain distance from the trail.  Following a GPX is a little more complicated.  When you follow a GPX the Garmin unit tries to get clever and may try to calculate a quicker route for you.  This can lead to you trying to follow a route different to the one you have previously plotted.  Apparently to get around this you can turn off “route recalculationâ€Â� in your Garmin settings

Turn by turn prompts can be set up using GPX or TCX files.  I believe they are set up automatically using GPX.  If you want them in your TCX you have to put waypoint markers (not to be confused with trackpoints) in the route you plot.  There is a limit of 100 waypoints to a track but you can have thousands of trackpoints.  Personally I find the prompts a little irritating and of limited use off-road so would only put them in places that I expected navigation to get a bit tricky.  For this reason and because of the unit’s tendency to re-navigate GPX routes I would suggest using TCX files to navigate from

Routes (GPX) loaded onto your unit can be accessed through “Where to > Saved Ridesâ€Â�.  TCX files will be under “Training > Coursesâ€Â�


2. Maps:

There are several better options than the base map installed on the Garmin unit which is quite frankly rubbish.  The two I have looked at are openmtbmap and Talkytoaster.  Personally I prefer openmtbmap for clarity and ease of reading.  Neither are perfect on the small screen as the more you zoom out the more cluttered they become, but either will allow you to follow the trails you are on with relative clarity.  Level of detail of either map can be changed in the settings menu.  I generally find a zoom of 120-200ft is about right to follow.  Either link will have clear instructions about how to get the maps onto your PC and onto your Garmin unit.  I believe either of the above maps can be setup to show contour lines, however I prefer not to use these as they can make the map a little busy.  I personally wouldn’t use the 705 to navigate without the backup of paper maps, or Google maps on my mobile phone


3. Software:

It seems there are a fair few ways to plot routes and get them on your Garmin.  Again I expect personal preference plays a part here.  My preferred choice is to use Mapsource with openmtbmap loaded on it.  Once I have plotted a track (not route) and saved it as a GPX I then upload it to Bikeroutetoaster and load it onto the Garmin as a TCX.  Note you will need the Garmin Communicator Plugin to do this.  You can also save it to your PC as a TCX if you like, although unfortunately it seems to go into “Downloadsâ€Â� and is just called “Courseâ€Â� so the file then needs to be moved and renamed


4) Other notes:

The pink line you follow may not always be directly on the path you should be on due to errors in plotting tracks/routes and GPS tolerences.  Don’t expect it to be perfect.  I expect plotting trackpoints carefully can help with this to some degree – my trackpoint plotting can be a bit slapdash

I updated the firmware of my 705 to version 3.30 which seems to be a slight improvement (backlight settings are saved amongst other things).  Note that saved rides, preferences and other data may be lost when you do this so its best to backup beforehand!

I learned a lot from reading a few threads on the CTC and Garmin forums.  This thread and this thread in particular were quite helpful
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#2
I'm trying to get openmtbmap onto my Garmin 800. I downloaded the Great Britain maps from the site which was saved into C:\Garmin\openmtbmap\great_britain, i clicked on "create gmapsupp.img like the instructions on the site told me to and it opens a screen with a black background and white writing which says C:\\Windows\system32\cmd.exe, i click on 0 for classic layout, then tells me to "please put gmapsupp.ing into folder /garmin/ on your gps memory < choose mass stopage mode>, so i opened the Garmin folder on the memory card and created a new folder called gmapsupp.ing, then it said to press any key to exit, and nothing happens.

Am i doing it right, as i am totally confused :B
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#3
I can't help i'm afraid as I too cannot find the any key on my keyboard
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#4
&quot;Breezer&quot; Wrote:I can't help i'm afraid as I too cannot find the any key on my keyboard

Lol.

Meant to say, I pressed any key the dialogue box closed, and nothing happened.
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#5
&quot;Treehugger&quot; Wrote:I'm trying to get openmtbmap onto my Garmin 800. I downloaded the Great Britain maps from the site which was saved into C:\Garmin\openmtbmap\great_britain, i clicked on "create gmapsupp.img like the instructions on the site told me to and it opens a screen with a black background and white writing which says C:\\Windows\system32\cmd.exe, i click on 0 for classic layout, then tells me to "please put gmapsupp.ing into folder /garmin/ on your gps memory < choose mass stopage mode>, so i opened the Garmin folder on the memory card and created a new folder called gmapsupp.ing, then it said to press any key to exit, and nothing happens.

Am i doing it right, as i am totally confused :B

It didnt tell you to create a folder on the memory card called gmapsupp.ing so why did you do it?  :Smile

The window you mentioned is a command prompt and it will probably have generated the gmapsupp.ing file in the directory you ran it from on your PC ie c:\garmin\openmtbmap\great_britain\

Go in there, find gmapsupp.ing, copy it then go to your garmin and the /garmin directory and chuck it in there.
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