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Saddle Position : Thigh Ache
#1
Mentioned a few times in verious topics that my legs have "properly" ached for the past few months when riding, a pain Ive not typicially felt before when riding

This has come along since fitting a new saddle.  Climbing has been terrible, overall improvement in riding has been zero.

On a ride last night, I rode as normal for 30mins, then decided to stop and tweak my saddle.

On the rails, it was back quite far, to what felt comfortable in reach to the bars.

The only direction the saddle would go was forwards, so moved forward by just under an inch, I also tilter the nose up a fraction.

For the remainder of the ride it felt better, and felt more use of the back my legs this time.

So experts, whats fixed that, and what was I doing wrong, whats the tell-tale setup to ensure my fore/aft saddle position is correct?

I feel a lot nearer the bars, but legs feel better for it.
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#2
Saddle position should not be governed by distance to the bars.
Saddle should be adjusted so that with your pedal midway in the power stroke (3 o'clock) the front of your knee is directly over the ball of your foot which is in turn directly over the pedal axle.

Seat should be flat or slightly nose down.

It's acceptable to then tweak this to suit different shape riders & bike, but this is the start point.

If you moved your saddle forward an "inch" you were simply too far back on the bike & your shins were probably not even upright under power let alone pointed backwards...... All very inefficient tbh.
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#3
"Tinc" Wrote:Saddle position should not be governed by distance to the bars.
Saddle should be adjusted so that with your pedal midway in the power stroke (3 o'clock) the front of your knee is directly over the ball of your foot which is in turn directly over the pedal axle.

Seat should be flat or slightly nose down.

It's acceptable to then tweak this to suit different shape riders & bike, but this is the start point.

If you moved your saddle forward an "inch" you were simply too far back on the bike & your shins were probably not even upright under power let alone pointed backwards...... All very inefficient tbh.

Explains everything, nothing to do with me a fat b@stard then!  Tongue

Will review the layout again then following your tips.

I found myself slightly sliding forward, hence the very fraction tilt of the seat, but this in turn, I would imagine turns my hips, so I will re-address this.

I went through the same issues when I had the Trance, so shouldve learned by now!
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#4
"BMJBOY" Wrote:I went through the same issues when I had the Trance, so shouldve learned by now!

And the Ribble, don't sell yourself short  Tongue

The seat should be "flat" - that is the front of the nose at the same height as the rear of the er.. rear.
With modern saddles being such complex shapes this is much easier to say than to acheive.

A good starting point is to stand the bike on flat ground & put a sprirt level across the seat that is long enough to reach from the front to the back or a shorter level on something else that's longer.
I'd then advise nosing it down abit.

The idea of the seat not being nosed up is simply pressure on your undercarriage.  There's alot of important stuff down there that you do not want to stop blood flowing to.... Three points to ponder:

1: What's likely to happen if you restrict the blood flow to your legs whilst cycling.

2. Lots of reasearch suggests that sterility & impotence may be more common in regular male cyclists than most other sections of the population.  Badly adjusted saddles is usually citited as the reasoning for this.

3. Pins & needles in the old chap when you get off the bike is an "interesting" sensation :B

[Edit]See this.  I'd recommend my reply 43 & your 52 Wink
Not sure I ever saw my kiss either :K)[edit]
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