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First roadie
#1
Today i purchased my first road bike.  I used the current cycle to work scheme and went for the maximum i could, £1000, and bought a Boardman Team at £999. I chose to take the bike boxed and build from home as the Canterbury staff did not install too much confidence. I have assembled the bike and on initial inspection its not bad despite some frame paint coming away when i screwed on a bottle holder.  Im aware the frames are subject to bad reviews overall however i choose the more expensive bike as the components are fairly good and if i like riding roadies i can get a new frame and transfer.

Hoping to ride to work next week when my new roadie shoes and pedals arrive as i couldnt  be seen on a roadie with the mtb shoe/pedal spd set-up  Wink

Im really looking forwards to getting out and shredding some miles and wondered if there was anything in particular you could advise me on.  

Thinking of attaching a small saddle bag to carry a few tools spares etc... What do you carry. I really would like to keep minimal.  

Once ive mastered this strange new riding position and built up the legs up alittle it would be nice to get out and join in with you chaps  Smile

Here she is

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.boardmanbikes.com/road/road_team.html">http://www.boardmanbikes.com/road/road_team.html</a><!-- m -->

The Spicy is taking a back seat, cleaned and prep'd for trips (if i ever get the opportunity to take some leave)
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#2
Hello & welcome to the Darkside..... ;D
You will like it here Wink
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#3
As the spicy is redundant fancy selling me your reverb. You can buy some Lycra and some bid razors ready for your transition to the other side.
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#4
Adie, congratulations on your new purchase and welcome to the wonderful world is road riding!

My biggest recommendation if you want to get the miles in and keep your enjoyment of road riding is to invest in some decent puncture resistance tires, I spent a good couple of years and a bucket load of cash experimenting with tires and still spending night upon night in the garage repairing flats, one week I counted 4 nights spent in the garage repairing tubes....not fun.....as I was riding every morning to loose weight.

After trying numerous tires from 9.99 - 39.99 per tire, I would recomment the schwalbe marathon plus as THE most puncture proof tire on the market, put a good 500 miles into them without a single puncture, however the ride feel and speed lacks a little and I have since been using continental garorskins, which are quicker but a lot harder ride.

I've never had a puncture using either of the above tires and would highly recommend if you want to avoid spending your riding time by the roadside changing tubes..

Apart from that, small saddlebag with tire levers, multitool, small telescopic handpump , tube, self adhesive patches/skins, and a needle to help push thorns out of the tire if you are unlucky....
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#5
Thanks guys.

Mash - Nah!! However i would recommend buying one Smile

I have done a little research into tyres and found that the Gatorskins do get very mixed reviews indeed.  From being awesome to cracking rims due to being so tight and hence a complete pain to get on/off?  Is there anything else out there? My bike came with some Vittoria Zaffiro's?  Also is it worth buying a decent cheap mini pump or use my Co2 pump?
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#6
Good choice of bike matey. I am not a bog fan of the matt finish of this years models but it's still cool.

I carry a multitool, patches, tube and a slim carbon pump from decathlon on the frame. I've got a co2 pump also but no gas for ages so not bothered carrying it.

I use Schwalbe Ultremo for the summer and lugano for the winter, always at 100+psi. The original contis were way too puncture prone.
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#7
I also read mixed reviews about the garorskins but then read a post that they have to ne kept above 110 psi to avoid punctures, and I've been running mine at 120 psi, check the tires regularly, and although I've found penetrations, I've pulled them out and nothing has got through he puncture belt.
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#8
very comprehensive tyre info here <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.lfgss.com/thread5985.html">http://www.lfgss.com/thread5985.html</a><!-- m -->, GAG2 seems to be the master of info collation and list formation, be wary of signing up and asking questions as most have already been asked, try using the search function first or face a hail of 'noob' insults.

Nice to see you've got a fast bike, but for all my '700 wheels are better' posts the other week, a nicely set-up mtb canes a roadie for fun times.

Breezer - Note, canes, not cains  Wink
Keep it foolish...
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#9
Very nice Ade, ive just sold my mtb for one.
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#10
&quot;Buzz&quot; Wrote:Very nice Ade, ive just sold my mtb for one.
You've been so quiet on here lately that wouldn't surprise me if it were true Wink
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