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Hurty Legs
#1
Finally dragged my Xmas-lardy butt out, on Sunday, for the 1st time since 5th December :B
Wow!  It was a struggle :'(
My thighs are still hurting now and I'm walking like I've been to a party with Alan Carr and Julien Clairy :o

D'ya reckon a few stretches before'n'after would've prevented that?

Anybody do the stretch/warm-up/warm-down thing?
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#2
Stretching before exercise actually increases your risk of injury.  The best thing you can do is start with the activity you are going to do, but just a little gently to "warm up".  Stretching afterwards is definitely more beneficial, for us bikers, hamstrings especially and back, but stretching your quads out won't do any harm either.
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#3
"impished" Wrote:Anybody do the stretch/warm-up/warm-down thing?

Should do, often say I will, rarely actually do.
2010 Canyon Aeroad 9.0 SL
2014 Specialized Epic Marathon
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#4
Some light stretching before exercise can help. Cool down and stretch afterwards should be done by all of us but never is.
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#5
"mashley" Wrote:Some light stretching before exercise can help. Cool down and stretch afterwards should be done by all of us but never is.

As Anna said, you shouldn't stretch muscles when they are cold before exercise as you could tear something. Gentle warm up, cool down for the last mile or so then stretches is the way to go.
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#6
i always try and stretch out my legs after a ride, even if its just touch my toes for a few seconds.
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#7
You can touch your toes? I cant get within a foot of mine due to tight/short hamstrings!
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#8
"Treehugger" Wrote:As Anna said, you shouldn't stretch muscles when they are cold before exercise as you could tear something. Gentle warm up, cool down for the last mile or so then stretches is the way to go.

But launching yourself cold into a climb is fine? Ive always done light stretching before riding and gym workouts and ive always managed to not tear muscles. I also tried not stretching before riding and noticed significantly more muscle burn.
Strange that footballers can often be seen stretching before a match.
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#9
You shouldn't do static stretching before exercise, you can do dynamic stretching though
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#10
"Blackers" Wrote:But launching yourself cold into a climb is fine? Ive always done light stretching before riding and gym workouts and ive always managed to not tear muscles. I also tried not stretching before riding and noticed significantly more muscle burn.
Strange that footballers can often be seen stretching before a match.

No, launching yourself cold into a climb is not fine.  I've run for years and never stretched before a run, just walked for the first 1/2 mile as this uses the same muscles and subsequently warms them up sufficiently for running.  I believe a gentle warm up in the same exercise you are about to embark on is the best way forward.  Therefore, cycling the first mile will warm up those muscles you intend on working the hardest.  

Being the swat I am and having a physio as a sister research has found that stretching before exercise can lead to an increased risk of injury: "Available evidence would suggest that pre-exercise
stretching may increase the risk of injury. However, basic science and preliminary clinical evidence would indicate that prolonged stretching in the post-exercise period may increase the energy absorbing capabilities of muscle thereby reducing the risk of injury." (Weldon and Hill, 2003; Manual Therapy, 8(3), pp. 141-150; Available at: Science Direct.com).

Hope that helps clarify.
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