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What size stem
#1
I'm looking to get a shorter stem for my Five, I have an 80mm stem length atm.
I'm stuck between 60mm and 40mm.
Do I go down the 20mm or go the whole, half the length?
I do XC/Trail riding, with a trip to either Wales or Scotland at least once a year
I'm a little indecisive as to what i should go for. Any advise would be appreciated
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#2
"Erd" Wrote:I'm looking to get a shorter stem for my Five, I have an 80mm stem length atm.
I'm stuck between 60mm and 40mm.
Do I go down the 20mm or go the whole, half the length?
I do XC/Trail riding, with a trip to either Wales or Scotland at least once a year
I'm a little indecisive as to what i should go for. Any advise would be appreciated

There's no right or wrong answer to that, just whichever feels best for you. I personally swear by shorter stems, whereas others are happy with their 100mm iron girders. Are you able to try anyone else's stems? I think 50mm is best for trail riding, 40mm is a big too short and I have problems keeping the front end down on climbs, but its all personal choice.
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#3
What's wrong with your current setup, and what are you trying to achieve  by  changing the stem? Does your current stem have a rise? If so what is it?

A 40mm or 50mm stem will usually come in a zero rise (there are a few exceptions). Just shortening the stem even keeping the same rise will effectively lower your bars quite significantly, add a zero rise into the mix and the result is a very large drop in bar height.

As an example going from a 80mm stem with 6 degree rise to a 40mm stem zero rise will give you 33mm less reach and lower the bars by 23mm (on a Five with 140mm forks). Therefore you need to ensure you have enough spacers to raise the bars again (they will really need to be higher then they were now your reach has been reduced), or you need to factor in a new set of higher rise bars.

A shorter stem will also speed up your steering, therefore if you are already running bars on the narrow side then the bike will start to feel twitchy. This may well be another reason to factor in new bars even assuming you already had enough adjustment to account for the drop in height.

Finally there is no magic stem length, you can't just say 'I like a 50mm stem', it depends on frame sizing, riding style, how you want the bike to perform etc etc. As an example I like to run my trail bike similar to my downhill bike, therefore my shorter framed blood runs a slightly longer stem than the downhill bike to compensate.

I used to have a five and ran it with a 50mm stem, but I found I needed to run 38mm rise bars plus spacers to get a balanced ride position. I was running 160mm forks so needed extra height to compensate for the higher BB.

Hope this helps.
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#4
Cheers for the advice.
I'm looking to get better steering in tight single track corners. I have an 80mm stem with a 10 Deg rise, with 30mm riser bars. I have upgraded the the forks to 150mm also.
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#5
"Erd" Wrote:Cheers for the advice.
I'm looking to get better steering in tight single track corners. I have an 80mm stem with a 10 Deg rise, with 30mm riser bars. I have upgraded the the forks to 150mm also.

swapping your stem for a 50mm zero rise will shorten the reach by around 20mm and lower the bars by 25mm.

you could try a Renthal stem which is 50mm and has a 10 degree rise which will reduce the reach by 25mm and lower the bars by 17mm. If you fitted 38mm riser bars and added some spacers under the stem you may get it to something that you can use. You may get away with just adding spacers and not swapping bars especially if you run your bars rolled back a little, as there is obviously room to roll them forward which can make a huge difference to bar height especially on a 30mm rise.

The danger of running low bars with a short reach is that you then tend to try and get behind the bars which pushes your weight back, the result being loss of front end grip and much slower cornering speeds.
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#6
Ok thanks.

I might try a 60mm no rise with 40mm rise bars?
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#7
a 60mm with no rise will drop the bars by 20mm.

Have you got any room to add spacers under the stem?

It seems like you are running quite a high front end anyway. Could be that the frame is a little small? You could try something like this <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=41915">http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=41915</a><!-- m --> or their 50mm x 6 deg if you want to make a bigger impact on your setup.
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#8
No room for spacers under, and yes the frame is a 16"
Cheers for the suggestions (might give a go).
Thank you very much for you advise once  again!
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