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chillis + cycling = lots of sweating
#1
In the past few years I've taken to growing chillis and this has naturally lead me from being someone who used to be scared by the things to someone who sees them as a bit of a challenge (though you won't catch me eating a phaal or raw scotch bonnet etc). I don't think my body has a great tolerance of them as it doesn't take a particularly hot chilli to bring out little beads of sweat.

Really hot food has the same effect as a hard cycle road. The sweat drips down my face and in my eyes and mouth and down my neck.

Should I put more salt on my fish and chips to counteract this?

I don't want to start drinking those fancy electrolyte drinks which CRC was recently pushing on their customers.

Should I eat more spinach pasta or something?
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#2
I can't really help with your question but I ate a scotch bonnet once like an apple!  :o oh my god it was emmense. It made me sick and I needed gallons of milk to cool me down.
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#3
"mashley" Wrote:I can't really help with your question but I ate a scotch bonnet once like an apple!  :o oh my god it was emmense. It made me sick and I needed gallons of milk to cool me down.

There's no way I'd ever do that. My girlfriend was cross enough when I tricked her into licking the tip of a knife which I'd dabbed inside one  ;D
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#4
If you like chilli you're more than welcome to try some chilli sauce I have, its about 250,000 scoviles - if you're feeling really brave I also have a second bottle that is rated at around 500,000 scoviles that you can try - it comes in a box in the shape of a coffin.

Just as an addition to this, there is a chilli fest in east sussex - its on about this time of year IIRC, well worth a visit to if you're into chilli.
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#5
I've got a couple of "big jims" sprouting just now and also a plant from last year has also survived, got a few chillies but I had one this morning and it wasnt really hot at all, more pepper like.

When should I harvest them?  Most are still quite small, green  and pointing upwards - only a few have started to grow downwards.
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#6
"Bertie" Wrote:I've got a couple of "big jims" sprouting just now and also a plant from last year has also survived, got a few chillies but I had one this morning and it wasnt really hot at all, more pepper like.

When should I harvest them?  Most are still quite small, green  and pointing upwards - only a few have started to grow downwards.

Depends on the variety really. Some have a long growing season while others mature faster (just like us humans ;-)). I've harvested several Jalepeno already, some of which had turned red. If picked too soon I usually find they have a bitter taste and the seeds are still very white and soft. I think some varieties are better once ripened, and many are hotter when ripened. Heat variation can happen from plant to plant within a single variety and also from pepper to pepper. Some say treating them mean by starving them of water increases the plant's will to deter predators by making the peppers hotter. I usually just pick one and see.
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#7
"jellylegs" Wrote:If you like chilli you're more than welcome to try some chilli sauce I have, its about 250,000 scoviles - if you're feeling really brave I also have a second bottle that is rated at around 500,000 scoviles that you can try - it comes in a box in the shape of a coffin.

Just as an addition to this, there is a chilli fest in east sussex - its on about this time of year IIRC, well worth a visit to if you're into chilli.

Ummm not sure about those sauces  Sad :o >Sad :'( :X ;D My partner came home with a bag of scotch bonnets not long ago and we made scotch bonnet sauce with 18 of them. It is rather hot but very very tasty as a coating for chicken before throwing on the bbq.

Am going to the RHS chilli weekend in a couple of weeks.
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#8
Be aware that if you eat them consistently for a while then your body odour changes for the worse >Sad
I'm going through lots of t-shirts that I wear for riding & also work in as they still smell after washing :X
Still love hot peppers though Tongue
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#9
"billynobates" Wrote:Be aware that if you eat them consistently for a while then your body odour changes for the worse >Sad
I'm going through lots of t-shirts that I wear for riding & also work in as they still smell after washing :X
Still love hot peppers though Tongue

Remind me to avoid riding with you :X  Tongue
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#10
"billynobates" Wrote:Be aware that if you eat them consistently for a while then your body odour changes for the worse >Sad
I'm going through lots of t-shirts that I wear for riding & also work in as they still smell after washing :X
Still love hot peppers though Tongue

[Mrs Doubtfire mode on]Try Halo sports wash[Mrs Doubtfire mode off]
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