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Sea Kayak
#11
"Jon" Wrote:Longjon, those boats are fun. I have been out on a very powerful one with the sbs in poole. I initially wanted to build a mahogany runaround like the Riva Aquarama with a 5.7l V8 but common sence pervailed! Well that and building a 19' boat in a 18' garage was never going to work.

Treehugger, although the kayak is 17' overall the waterline length is the important value when considering speed and handling. This one has a waterline length of about 13'6" so is relatively short. By the time the hull meets the water the bow and stern have lost most of the pointyness (proper technical term that  Big Grin ) and therefore has very little v to the hull thus making turning easier. Also the soft chines help as it is the hard chines which improve the tracking. I used a valley is Skye and with moderate crosswinds the skeg made a big difference to the tracking, particularly with winds on the rear quarter. Having said that I had no problem turning the valley with the skeg up. This design is also about 2/3 of the weight of the valley so will have a shallower draught which will also improve the turning.

I will be using some form of foot braces but havent decided on an adjustable bulkhead type or foot pegs yet. Padded knee braces will be built into the cockpit coaming and I will be building in hip braces as well. There will be a hatch lip beneath the hatch covers. This will contain the weather seal and the hatches will be held shut with powerful magnets. This is a well proven design with many of these kayaks being this way.

It will take me quite a time to finish this one (somewhere between 300 - 500 hours) so there is plenty of time for the final design to be adapted but I hope to have it finished towards the middle of next summer. Any comments on improvements or modifications to make it better are appreciated.


We only had twin 100 on ours the Department didn't like paying the fuel bill!!
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#12
You''ll want decent outfitting, have a look at Piranha's Connect 30. It's their whitewater outfitting but it's very comfortable  and should be easy to retrofit into any boat, and includes adjustable thigh braces with a ratchet for the back band. I 'm pretty sure you can  buy it all separately.
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#13
"Longjon" Wrote:We only had twin 100 on ours the Department didn't like paying the fuel bill!!

Tell me about it! I had to fill up 2 of the with premium unleaded. Cost around £2500 each! Thankfully it was on expenses. Think they were fitted out with 3 500hp motors. 65 knots in 6-8' seas will leave you feeling broken.
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#14
Is this the same process you are following? <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FB-eCprJ8eU&nbsp;&nbsp;Looks">http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FB-eCprJ8e ... nbsp;Looks</a><!-- m --> like a lot of work, but will be worth it, i really like the look of wooden strip kayaks, so much better than rotormolded and fiberglass. What i said about the seat, probably better to use foam and custom make one. Most of the plastic seats are screwed in from the top of the hull which would ruin the look.
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#15
Yeah, that is how I am building it. The guy who made the video is the designer and owner of the company that I got the plans from. He makes it look easy. It is the fibre glassing that I am not looking forward to. That is the stage it might all go a bit wrong. Like you suggest I will probably make a seat out of minicell foam. That will be a long way in the future though.

Cedar strip kayaks do look awesome and I hope this one turns out ok. On another note, there was a guy on ebay a couple of months ago building and selling guillemot kayaks to order for £5800  :o
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#16
&quot;Jon&quot; Wrote:Yeah, that is how I am building it. The guy who made the video is the designer and owner of the company that I got the plans from. He makes it look easy. It is the fibre glassing that I am not looking forward to. That is the stage it might all go a bit wrong. Like you suggest I will probably make a seat out of minicell foam. That will be a long way in the future though.

Cedar strip kayaks do look awesome and I hope this one turns out ok. On another note, there was a guy on ebay a couple of months ago building and selling guillemot kayaks to order for £5800  :o

Yeah i just saw that one. Not surprising really considering the amount of man hours to build it. Have you seen the vid on youtube of the guy that videoed building start to finish over 2 1/2 years and sped it up to a 13 min vid?
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#17
I've not seen that video. Do you have the link?
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#18
Here you go <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wXdI-8biZss">http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=wXdI-8biZss</a><!-- m --> Theres loads of vids on there, i've spent most of the evening watching them, really interesting.
&quot;Jon&quot; Wrote:I've not seen that video. Do you have the link?
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#19
So, I haven't touched the kayak at all until this week but at last all my exams, moving house, work and all the other crap going on has finished so I have finally been able to make some progress on this damned sea kayak.

My brother-in-law kindly cut all the cedar planks into 5mm thick strips so that I could begin the arduous task if stripping the kayak.  As the strips have square edges and the kayak is rounded all the individual strips have to have the edge shaped so that an approximation of a curve can be made.  The curve of the hull changes along its length so the angle of the bevel cut into the strip edges has to constantly change along its length.  This "rolling bevel" has to be made by hand using a block plane and no two strips are the same.

At least one of the hardest parts (stripping around the chine, where the side of the hull curves sharply to the bottom) is now done.

Anyway, here are a couple of picture of the progress from this week.

resim

resim

resim
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#20
1 x fully stripped kayak hull

resim

Next:  Strip the deck
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