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HR Zone Training / Cheap HRM Setup
#1
Hi,

Two things:

Firstly - Does anyone here do an zone training? I've been reading bits about as a way to enhance endurance. Has anyone got any good links to resources or personal experience?

Secondly - what are my options for getting the most affordable HRM setup? It seems from first looking that a Garmin 500 is the best option with all the info being available in front of you?

Cheers
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#2
Just my thoughts mate but HR zone training is possibly the most boring type of training I've come across but that's probably because I only use it to cut weight and never for endurance. Riding along constantly checking on your HR would be uber frustrating for me and make going out on the bike a chore.

On the flip side though if you are really strict and stick at it I'm sure it would really helpful.

If you were just thinking of trying it out I would get a cheap polar HR monitor for about 30 quid and tape it to your bars. All that shows on the screen is your HR on big numbers and you can actually set them so they beep if you go above or below your zone you've set.
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#3
Ive done zone training, and tbh, its hard to regulate as you are always reacting. However its structured which is better than no structure at all.

This details a good training plan that can fit your available times and so on, a turbo/rollers helps massively here as you are not weather impacted.
2010 Canyon Aeroad 9.0 SL
2014 Specialized Epic Marathon
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#4
Sailor knows a lot about it in running terms & really likes to talk about it too!!

He has lots of resources, websites & books at his disposal if you would like me to get some info e-mailed & I can pass on...... Undecided

I know a little, but not in enough depth to impart anything of substance (usually switch off after 10 mins of intricate blabber on the subject)
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#5
"DaisyDaring" Wrote:I know a little

Last time you spoke on this subject the concept of 'Max' was beyond you.
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#6
Is that supposed to have a link to something?  Undecided

Cheers for all the comments - I can see it being a little boring yeah but I'm enticed by the structured plan which usually suits me well and gets me out. I find at this time of year just getting out and doing some miles on some offroad tracks than aren't covered in mud is more enjoyable than cutting up and trudging around the local singletrack....

"treaclesponge" Wrote:Ive done zone training, and tbh, its hard to regulate as you are always reacting. However its structured which is better than no structure at all.

This details a good training plan that can fit your available times and so on, a turbo/rollers helps massively here as you are not weather impacted.
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#7
Whoops, Ive updated my post with the hyperlink.

A little boring is an understatement, its VERY boring. If you go out you will not enjoy it as you are a slave to the monitor.
2010 Canyon Aeroad 9.0 SL
2014 Specialized Epic Marathon
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#8
Zone training can be very tricky in the real world as it often means you have to back off going up hill & work really, really hard on the downs to stay where you want to be.
You'll also find that without serious planning the trail heads down, just as you need to start a high level zone blast - sods law I'm afraid Sad
The planning required to get the best out of it in the real world adds to the boredom.

Works much better on a turbo as you have more control & gives you something to take your mind off the uber boredom of using the turbo.
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#9
Go for a road ride, don't get your bike dirty for this madness
Keep it foolish...
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#10
It's really hard to stay in zones on a mtb, road bike is the way to go for that stuff.
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