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Bike fitting
#1
I'm interested on people's thoughts on bike fitting. My new road bike is causing some back ache after an hour or more in the saddle. I've tweaked the setup and will continue to do so but was considering a proper setup session. What I don't want to do is fork out for something I can do myself which is why I'm keen to hear experiences and recommendations

For those that don't know I have a history of back issues and had surgery a couple of years ago so I'm quite susceptible to these kinds of issue
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#2
One of the Kent Trails guys has had a bike fit for all of his recent bike purchases after back issues and swears by it. I believe it costs a bit though. Are you able to work out what causes your back to play up, i.e, being too stretched out or upright etc? It may be cheaper to experiment with different length stems or bar height first. I used to have back issues when on the bike and eventually worked out that if i'm too stretched out i'm in agony, which is why i've always had short stems since. Do you have issues on the MTB's too? If not you could try transfering the same set up to the roadie? It could also be the lack of suspension and the resultant harsher ride that could be causing it, i can't ride a HT for more than 10 mins without mine spazzing out, but fine on the full suss.
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#3
Shorter stem pointing up like on an mtb, who cares if it looks less cool. At the very least flip the one on it and raise it up as far as you can on the steerer. I already said in the original buying thread that a road bike isnt a good idea with a history of back issues but my posts are invisible
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#4
"Breezer" Wrote:Shorter stem pointing up like on an mtb, who cares if it looks less cool. At the very least flip the one on it and raise it up as far as you can on the steerer. I already said in the original buying thread that a road bike isnt a good idea with a history of back issues but my posts are invisible
We all read your posts dude Wink Nick wanted something to ride on the road though, and you never know if your gonna have problems without trying first. Fingers crossed it's just gonna be a simple fix.
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#5
Iv had people say it's the best thing they have paid out on and others say it's the biggest wast of money ever that they have spent.
A customer of mine recently went for a fitting with his road bike after suffering back pain to be recommended a longer stem as it was pointed out to him being more upright on a road bike would be making his leg mussels less affective  and putting more strain on the back. It work for him and his problem, isn't what my thought would have been but then I'm no bike fitter.
If it was me I'd look at the cost of the fitting and if I could afford it I'd happily give it a go, with the understanding that with things like back problems there might not be a total fix, but then I'm sure  you know a lot more about the whole issues with backs more then any of us. Worth a go in my opinion, hardest part would be deciding which person to go to.
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#6
Ive not had back issues on the roadie but did suffer from knee issues as already documented about a billion times.

I went down to an 80mm from a 110mm stem to sit me up more and relax my hamstrings tendons around the knee. I tried to go back to the 110mm stem but i felt to stretched out, bike was definitely more stable out of the saddle and putting the power down. Im now running a 90mm stem....

The 80mm i got from mike (uphill), happy to post it to you if you want to try it, im sure mike wont mind.
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#7
Thanks for the thoughts, lots of constructive ideas

Breezer - I have flipped the stem and tried to gradually raise the bars and don't have much further to go, however I can still get another cm or so height so it's got to be worth trying.  I'm sure I can get it set up to avoid too many issues - just need to work out whether it worth paying someone else with more expertise to sort it for me

Buzz - if you can send me that stem I'd be very grateful - I do still feel a little stretched out but then I'm used to a MTB

My main concern is spending £100+ on a fitting session that does little to help (or just uses internet advice that I can do for myself) so i'd love to get some recommendations of where would do a good job
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#8
Try bringing your saddle forwards a couple of cm. it'll take pressure off your back, neck and wrists
Keep it foolish...
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#9
"Treehugger" Wrote:We all read your posts dude Wink Nick wanted something to ride on the road though, and you never know if your gonna have problems without trying first. Fingers crossed it's just gonna be a simple fix.

Its not illegal to ride an mtb on the road you know, I do it quite often as I cant ride offroad much and its too dangerous to ride on the road in the dark and wet due to all the hidden potholes, at least on the mtb you have a chance of riding them out
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#10
"alkali" Wrote:Try bringing your saddle forwards a couple of cm. it'll take pressure off your back, neck and wrists

Yes but avoid going to far else the knee will be to far in front of the axle which will then probably lead to knee Issues
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