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Save the Pilgrims Hospice Canterbury
#1
After a meeting of Trustees on 7th May it has been decided to close the inpatient unit at Canterbury. Resources (namely staff) will be trained & deployed into the community as that is where they feel we are needed. There are 16 beds at each site, meaning we will lose â…“ of our inpatient beds. Nursing in the community, nursing homes & hospitals is of paramount importance, but losing our inpatient beds will be devastating for the community. Caring for a dying person at home is a tremendously strenuous situation. Symptoms can become uncontrollable, personal care can become a huge issue. We cannot care for those patients in their home the same way as we can in the Hospice. 32 beds is not enough for the whole of East Kent. Please support us and sign the petition:

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<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/fao-steve-auty-retract-plans-to-close-the-pilgrims-hospice-canterbury-in-2016-and-allow-it-to-remain-in-its-current-working-state?utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=share_facebook_mobile&recruiter=92624968">http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/f ... r=92624968</a><!-- m -->
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#2
Completely agree!
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#3
A couple of friends have unfortunately had to use the services of the Piglrims Hospice, so I'm all for it staying - the work done here is simply amazing at such a delicate time. Signed.
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#4
&quot;Jamiem&quot; Wrote:A couple of friends have unfortunately had to use the services of the Piglrims Hospice, so I'm all for it staying - the work done here is simply amazing at such a delicate time. Signed.

Thank you.

We've all been humbled by the support and personal stories of how the hospice has helped people. I just hope it's enough to get the a trustees to review the decision. At the end of the day, it's the community that supports us and so the community should have a say in how the services are provided.
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#5
Signed.

Just out of curiosity, I presume the trustees don't plan to close 1/3 of their beds without a good reason. What is the rationale and why would that only be applicable to Canterbury? I have seen my neighbour being cared for at home and in his last couple of days in Canterbury hospice; I think a mix of both in-house / in the community care is best.
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#6
Signed!
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#7
&quot;WvH&quot; Wrote:Signed.

Just out of curiosity, I presume the trustees don't plan to close 1/3 of their beds without a good reason. What is the rationale and why would that only be applicable to Canterbury? I have seen my neighbour being cared for at home and in his last couple of days in Canterbury hospice; I think a mix of both in-house / in the community care is best.

No, there is rationale behind the decision, mainly that we have the majority of patients in the community. Most people want to die at home and they want to direct more resources to them. That is perfectly reasonable. I think what we see are people, patients & families, who have become exhausted from pain management, managing their loved ones personal care, the psychological strain...Being able to admit someone to the Hospice means giving both parties the rest & support they need. To get back on top of symptoms; pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of mobility, depression, to name but a few. This can take days of careful medical management. Some people need pain breakthroughs 1 or 2 hourly, and if they can't manage by mouth, the families cannot administer this medication. I want to know how we're going to manage our most challenging patients. Are they going to restrict access to the other Hospices? What if the families don't have their own transport? What if they're elderly & poorly themselves? I'm back to work tomorrow and they're holding public meetings from the 26/5. As I said previously, supporting patients at home, in nursing homes and acute hospitals is paramount, as is educating other health professionals. But I feel it will be to the detriment of some families, even if that is a minority in the eyes of the Trustees.

Edit: I think Canterbury as it's the oldest site. The other 2 were specifically built for purpose, Canterbury was an acquired building.
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#8
I am not well versed in end of life care facilitation but is it not possible that a greater number of people could benefit from the knowledge, kindness and expertise that the Pilgrims staff provide by the lose of the 16 beds?

There are several hospices in Kent I believe in addition to the Pilgrims Hospices at Thanet and Ashford so the mention of 32 beds in total is a touch misleading.

I have read a few reports on the news and it does not mention the Hospice closing but rather becoming an admin, training, and base for in the community staff as well as continuing to be used as a day center.

In an ideal world the Canterbury building would be just that but with a new purpose built unit nearby....  but that appears to be out of the question so the trustees, who I would like to think have the best  intentions at heart, have made the tough decision to provide a lesser level of care to a greater number of people.


I have posted not to anger or annoy anyone and I have absolute respect for peoples feelings.

My point is, if you want this decision to be reversed then using your head as well as your heart will be important, remember too the people that will be denied any sort of care or respite while the 16 are lavished with it.

I am sad the beds are going...  but half an hours research has made me seriously question whether it is for the greater good....   another couple of weeks and attending a meeting or 2 would be enough for me to decide with a clear mind.
Mei securis turpe meus vox<br />            
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#9
&quot;Mbnut&quot; Wrote:I am not well versed in end of life care facilitation but is it not possible that a greater number of people could benefit from the knowledge, kindness and expertise that the Pilgrims staff provide by the lose of the 16 beds?

There are several hospices in Kent I believe in addition to the Pilgrims Hospices at Thanet and Ashford so the mention of 32 beds in total is a touch misleading.

I have read a few reports on the news and it does not mention the Hospice closing but rather becoming an admin, training, and base for in the community staff as well as continuing to be used as a day center.

In an ideal world the Canterbury building would be just that but with a new purpose built unit nearby....  but that appears to be out of the question so the trustees, who I would like to think have the best  intentions at heart, have made the tough decision to provide a lesser level of care to a greater number of people.


I have posted not to anger or annoy anyone and I have absolute respect for peoples feelings.

My point is, if you want this decision to be reversed then using your head as well as your heart will be important, remember too the people that will be denied any sort of care or respite while the 16 are lavished with it.

I am sad the beds are going...  but half an hours research has made me seriously question whether it is for the greater good....   another couple of weeks and attending a meeting or 2 would be enough for me to decide with a clear mind.


I think a days worth of experience here would be enough.

Just out of curiosity, where did you find the other Hospices in East Kent?
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#10
Now I am home, I'll reply more properly.

Nigel, if you read my two previous posts I have acknowledged and truly believe putting more into the community is fundamentally a good thing.  I do not believe this should be at the cost of our ward.  There are already community nurse specialists, the day centres at each hospice, outreach centres in places like Faversham (and I believe a few others), the Hospice at Home team who visit dying patients at home.  The patients we see in the Hospice are very complex and difficult, also mentioned in my previous post, and would be very difficult to manage at home.  Our services need to evolve and change, both in nursing and the the wider scope, but to lose this ward would be damaging to our most vulnerable patients.  I did stipulate that these beds are East Kent only, there are other Hospices, of course, but not in this neck of the woods. We serve a very large community, the argument the Trustees are using is the growing older population with increasing needs (â„… morbidities, increasing age etc), surely then we need these beds more.  People in the community should have the same opportunity to support from the hospice that those have as inpatients, but this is not the right way to do it.  I urge you to watch the 10 minute BBC clip and perhaps try to understand the relief we give to those trying to support dying patients at home.  It is hard to imagine what environment and support we provide if you have not experienced it, but with 15,000+ people against this move it think that shows how important this is to the community.  It is very hard not to be upset, not because it is an uncertain time for us (though we have been assured our jobs are safe), but because we feel the foundation of what we believe in is threatened.  
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