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Electronic shifting from Shimano
#1
Ooohhh, electronic shifting for mountain bikes

Here's the link: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://m.bikeradar.com/mtb/news/article/shimano-xtr-di2-electronic-shifting-comes-to-mountain-bikes-41184/">http://m.bikeradar.com/mtb/news/article ... kes-41184/</a><!-- m -->
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#2
It sounds good, but WAY too expensive, £450 for the rear mech alone!
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#3
&quot;Treehugger&quot; Wrote:It sounds good, but WAY too expensive, £450 for the rear mech alone!

Some people on this forum have unlimited mountain bike budgets though
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#4
&quot;Treehugger&quot; Wrote:It sounds good, but WAY too expensive, £450 for the rear mech alone!

Interesting statement.....
Where do you see an advantage in this system over a conventional cable set up.
Not picking a fight; genuinely intrigued....
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#5
I quite like the thought of the self setup and that it always adjusts itself to be shifting perfectly! Would love to try it!

Happy with the X01 for now. Love the 11 speed bizniz!  8)
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#6
&quot;Tinc&quot; Wrote:Interesting statement.....
Where do you see an advantage in this system over a conventional cable set up.
Not picking a fight; genuinely intrigued....

Always perfect indexing, no more faffing with barel adjusters and having to change cables every 5 minuets, and it makes a cool noise every time you change gear Wink
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#7
&quot;Treehugger&quot; Wrote:Always perfect indexing, no more faffing with barel adjusters and having to change cables every 5 minuets, and it makes a cool noise every time you change gear Wink

Mmmm.....
A bit like a new laptop that always starts up fast & does exactly what you want, exactly when you want Undecided

I just don't get this, I really don't.  Not for an MTB; & I'm usually a fan of questionably applied technology to a simple task.

Firstly, as the system doesn't appear to integrate with the chainrings or cassette the indexing & shifting performance remains reliant on correct set up.  After that shifting should be faultless, fast & accurate, but......

I still run 3x9 (:B - shut up Breezer) & I guess I change the cables every year & perhaps reindex twice between that as the cables stretch.
Maybe I'm lucky Undecided, but that takes all of the maintenance/set up gains out the equation in my view.
So I'm left with performance gains.  Only top end racers will gain anything from faster more accurate shifting on an MTB when there are so many other issues in the mix in the "our" world.
I also then question what happens when the system goes wrong/hits a rock/gets wet/rips a cable out etc..... halfway across Penmachno.
There's little bodging the system ability to get home I'm sure.

The rest of the industry is pushing 1x something (as most of you run) & the big "S" suggests crazily priced tech to reduce shifting issues & cross chaining........

You cite mostly maintenance issues, but would replace the current maintainable system with a battery powered, non adjustable, software driven black box.  The car industry did that & we all now pay nearly £100 per hour for a mechanic & some pay lots to have the software changed from the manufacturers recommendations.

What am I missing?  'Cause I just don't see it.

In my world (twisted as it maybe) if this tech is to be usefully applied to MTB it should actually be simply +/- controls - a bit like a sequential gearbox.  This tech, epecially with the ratio hunt thing, could do that, but they appear to have stopped short of it.

What most riders need is a system that will change gear as required & when required.  None of us need to know which gear we're in, we all want decluttered bars.  Imagine if your left thumb simply changed up & your right thumb simply changed down.
That could be applied to ?x? & make the positives of this system worth something to all of us.

I guess it has got me thinking at least Wink

Oh!  & with a bit of effort you could train yourself to go "beep" instead of "#~@|ing hell" everytime you shift - that sorts the cool noise thing too; sort of 8)
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#8
&quot;Tinc&quot; Wrote:What most riders need is a system that will change gear as required & when required.  None of us need to know which gear we're in, we all want decluttered bars.  Imagine if your left thumb simply changed up & your right thumb simply changed down.
That could be applied to ?x? & make the positives of this system worth something to all of us.

I agree with you for the most part, and it seems SRAM agree with you about this part. Albeit road specific at the moment, I presume this is the way the MTB stuff will go at some point. Especially if they could create something similar to the Di2 TT shifters.

Quote:...tapping the left-hand shifter paddle will move the rear derailleur to an easier gear while tapping the right-hand one will move it to a harder gear. Front shifts are performed by pushing both paddles at once, although the wording specifically calls out a 1x-compatible setup as well that should play with the cyclocross crowd...
2010 Canyon Aeroad 9.0 SL
2014 Specialized Epic Marathon
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#9
I think this tec is going to be a slow take up if ever in mtb. Agree with what your saying for the now  tinc, but will be interesting to see as with most inventions where it take us. And the what future possiblitys it could offer.
I remember having a conversation with someone a few years back when they were starting development on electronic shifting, and at the time talk was for  one of the aims was to have it for racing were you could pre program in what gear you wanted at what point on climbs and descents supposedly to get the right gear every time. To us mere  mortals this would be useless, but to a racing legend it might be what there looking for.
Also think with a advent of electronic shock adjustment having it that going in to an easier gear would automatically switch suspension into climb mode then when going into harder gears switch it into open DH mode.
Just me thinking that's all  Undecided oh the future I love it.  ;D
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#10
But have you heard the noise it makes? Wink

I like the idea, but it's hidiousely expensive and even if the tech does trickle down to XT and Deore it will still be too much for something so vulnerable. And as you say, if it breaks on the trail miles from civilization you're stuffed. I guess i'm attracted to the idea of perfect shifting all the time and no more cables gunked up with welsh mud and grit in 4 rides, as was the case with my bike. I think 10sp suffers worse from it than 9sp, my old 9sp X9 setup was perfect for months with no adjusting, but i've never been able to get 10sp Sram working perfect for more than a few rides.
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