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6hr mtb race: HT or FS
#1
Got on full suspension bike for first time in months felt like it sapped my strength. Back on hard tail and power back. So as title...
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#2
I've done the Big Dog on both. 29er HT or short travel FS both perfectly fine.  Ultimately your legs do the talking and if the FS is sapping your power output I suggest you look at your suspension setup
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#3
6hours? Go for comfort. I struggle to spend 6 hours on anything more hardcore than a sofa
Keep it foolish...
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#4
"General Sparks" Wrote:I've done the Big Dog on both. 29er HT or short travel FS both perfectly fine.  Ultimately your legs do the talking and if the FS is sapping your power output I suggest you look at your suspension setup

Yes that will be a good idea. It is a120mm travel XC bike. Would you say though in general your riding style needs to adjust?
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#5
"sirromj" Wrote:Yes that will be a good idea. It is a120mm travel XC bike. Would you say though in general your riding style needs to adjust?

To an extent yes. To help prevent bob you need to peddle smoothely without stamping on the peddles. You've probably got used to a stomping peddling style. I don't use lock out because i keep forgetting to turn it off and ruining DH's and have definitely noticed an improvement since first getting on a full suss. And for a 6hr race i would definitely go full suss.
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#6
I've raced 5hrs solo once before, on a 120mm 26" full suss.  I was completely wrecked afterwards, and I think I would have been wrecked no matter the bike.  I don't have back problems, so maybe could manage on a hardtail.  I think to some degree it depends on the course.  Lots of bumps and technical descents or even technical climbs, I think the FS is favoured.  Smooth or lots of non-technical climbs favours the HT.  The SITS course is well suited to a HT, whereas I thought the Gorrick 100 course was a FS course.
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#7
"Treehugger" Wrote:To an extent yes. To help prevent bob you need to peddle smoothely without stamping on the peddles. You've probably got used to a stomping peddling style. I don't use lock out because i keep forgetting to turn it off and ruining DH's and have definitely noticed an improvement since first getting on a full suss. And for a 6hr race i would definitely go full suss.

You should be pedalling smooth circles regardless of bike. This especially helps on technical climbs. I'd probably take the full sus. Add a few more psi to the rear to eliminate any excess pedal bob once you're pedalling smoothly.
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#8
"General Sparks" Wrote:You should be pedalling smooth circles regardless of bike. This especially helps on technical climbs. I'd probably take the full sus. Add a few more psi to the rear to eliminate any excess pedal bob once you're pedalling smoothly.

I think some time ago I found that if I could (partially) divert the load of my body weight off my backside and into pedalling then bumps are not so harsh and can go faster. Going fast is useful on the commute. Despite the FS being lighter by a couple of Lbs, it felt horribly squashy, but it also wasn't helped by having wrapped an inner tube too tightly round the chainstay and rear gear cable that shifting on the rear mech was useless. Yes comfort was a factor I thought of. Definitely need to get more practice on FS bike.

What sort of PSI do you run your tyres at? From looking at the values on the tyre walls and not wanting more dents in rear wheels I've gone for 40psi, which seems pretty hard.
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#9
"sirromj" Wrote:I think some time ago I found that if I could (partially) divert the load of my body weight off my backside and into pedalling then bumps are not so harsh and can go faster. Going fast is useful on the commute. Despite the FS being lighter by a couple of Lbs, it felt horribly squashy, but it also wasn't helped by having wrapped an inner tube too tightly round the chainstay and rear gear cable that shifting on the rear mech was useless. Yes comfort was a factor I thought of. Definitely need to get more practice on FS bike.

What sort of PSI do you run your tyres at? From looking at the values on the tyre walls and not wanting more dents in rear wheels I've gone for 40psi, which seems pretty hard.

Put more air in the shock if it feels too soft and wallowy. I run 30psi front and 32 rear, but it depends on your weight.
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#10
30psi usually. 40 is too high. Your tyres need to be able to deform over the surface they're rolling over.  This will give better grip and a smoother less bouncy ride. Though I pump the MTB ones up to 50 if I'm going to use it on the road.
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