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Food!
#1
It has become apparent that i am not eating enough of the types of food that athletes (which we theoretically are Wink) need to maintain energy levels when out riding. I ave been eating loads of carbs in the form of chicken and pasta, bread etc but don't think i have been eating enough protein and no dought many other food groups. So can anyone reccomend any foods/recipies (i have been know to cook occasionally :o) that would help me loose a few more pounds while increasing energy levels?

SteveT posted up this thread which is quite interesting but doesn't really give me any recipe ideas Undecided

Oh and i am a hopeless cook so the simpler the better Wink
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#2
pizza is  ment to be good for pre/after rides? I.E chicken pizza. The pizza base is high in Carbs
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#3
eggs some to be a good source of protien ... thats if you like them Big Grin scrambled egg or omelette = easy to do and you can add stuff to it to make it your own ...
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#4
Funny you should mention Pizza..  well fatty food anyway.  I used to make sure I ate things as low in fat as I could pre & post ride and I used to take ages to recover and bonk constantly (not in a good way Tongue)
Mrs Pished suggested that I should be eating more fatty foods before & and after and then I read an article in one of the bike mags suggesting bikers should stop carb loading just before effort and change to high fat diet.  If I know I'm going on a ride where one of our Sketchier members is preciding, I tend to use the fatty-day-before-method
That's my 2p worth Wink
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#5
Can I ask for some real world examples? What's peoples thoughts on what to eat one or two days before Sundays enduro?
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#6
"BMJBOY" Wrote:Can I ask for some real world examples? What's peoples thoughts on what to eat one or two days before Sundays enduro?
"BikeTraining101" Wrote:Here are a few basic rules of thumb:

   1. Don't eat within 2 hours of a bike race. The food needs time to digest and get out of your stomach before your bike race. If you eat too soon to your bike race you'll start to feel sick when you start to exert yourself. Some bike racers end up throwing up their breakfast during races because they don't follow this rule. Don't become one of them.
   2. Eat a high carbohydrate meal before your race. Oatmeal, whole grain breads, bagels and English muffins, pancakes, waffles, pasta. These are all good foods to eat before a bike race. They will give you the kind of energy you need to keep going for hours. Try to avoid white bread and sugar cereal before the bike race because they'll give you short term energy but won't be there when you really need it.
   3. No protein or dairy. Meat and eggs will sit in your stomach too long. You don't want things sitting in your stomach when you're trying to race in a bike race. Dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt may make you feel sick. Try to avoid these foods before your bike race.
   4. Hydrate. You also must remember to drink enough. Staying hydrated is really important to bike racing. Drinking an endurance drink is good for you during a bike race too, we like Gatorade Endurance ourselves. Drinking too much during a bike race isn't good either so you need to find the right balance for you.
   5. Eat and Drink. If it is going to be a particularly long bike race you may want to bring a small snack to eat along the way. Don't eat too much at once during the bike race or you'll get sick but you may need a recharge. A general rule of thumb for bike rides is to drink every 15 minutes and eat every 15 miles. I'm not sure how that goes with bike racing but it might be something to think about.
   6. After the race. Get more carbohydrates into you right away after the bike race, within 30 minutes. Also, replenish your vitamins. Get a recovery drink right after your bike race, that's what they're for. Eat your proteins now.


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#7
also :

The Day Before the Event

   1. Do everything in moderation! Don't try any new foods and eat a meal with plenty of carbohydrates and moderate fat and protein.
   2. Watch your protein and fiber intake. Foods that contain protein and fiber can "bulk you up" and mean extra pit stops during the race.
   3. Drink plenty of fluids, but don't go overboard since it could hold you up early in the race.

The Day of the Event

   1. Eat a breakfast that's not too bulky. A bagel, toast or pancakes are good choices. Allow at least two hours for digestion.
   2. If you choose not to eat breakfast, pre-load with energy gels at specific intervals - one packet an hour and a half before start time, again at 45 minutes prior, and a third right before the race begins.
   3. Watch your caffeine intake. Coffee and tea are diuretics and will increase pit stops during the race.
   4. Follow your established routine with gels and an electrolyte drink, making slight alterations depending on how you feel.
   5. Stay hydrated - consume at least one liter of water or electrolyte drink every hour, especially during hot weather.
   6. Replenish complex carbohydrates and amino acids by consuming one energy gel pack every 35 - 40 minutes of the race.
   7. Avoid food high in dietary fat, fiber, and protein, if you choose to eat solid food during the race.


EDIT : this is for roadies bear in mind ... taken straight from the sites my dad browses, dont blame me if its tosh ! blame him Tongue
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#8
steak and potatos the night before and then pasta fruit and yoghurt the day of the ride. but nothing in the 2 hours before riding. just read it in the free sports mag they give out at my gym.
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#9
&quot;Treehugger&quot; Wrote:It has become apparent that i am not eating enough of the types of food that athletes (which we theoretically are Wink) need to maintain energy levels when out riding. I ave been eating loads of carbs in the form of chicken and pasta, bread etc but don't think i have been eating enough protein and no dought many other food groups. So can anyone recommend any foods/recipes (i have been know to cook occasionally :o) that would help me loose a few more pounds while increasing energy levels?

SteveT posted up this thread which is quite interesting but doesn't really give me any recipe ideas Undecided

Oh and i am a hopeless cook so the simpler the better Wink

assuming you want to lean up and not just lose weight then it's the protein you need to make sure you're getting as if your C (Calories)[sup]*[/sup] in is less than your C expended and you don't have enough protein to maintain your body eg cell replication, muscle rebuilding etc then your body will break down your lean muscle for protein and all you'll end up doing is losing muscle.

meats are high in protein and chicken is one of the best sources for protein (not kfc or nuggets) however if you're serious about losing some weight (fat) then you'll want to invest in some form of supplement (at this point big brands are always best eg maxi muscle protein shakes contain high levels of fat in comparison to others)

this said assuming you're getting enough protein, at the end of the day (week) if your total C in is less than your total C burn then you'll lose weight, 500 C a day will ~ 1Lb a week (2Lb a week is the max recommended) FACT the only problem with this is that fatty foods are often the foods that make you feel full as it takes longer to process [sup]**[/sup] also 1g of carbs contains ~ 4C, 1g protein ~ 4C, 1g fat ~ 9C (why fatty foods make you put on weight) alcohol ~ 7C [sup]***[/sup]

as a rule if you're looking to get lean then you should aim for around 10% Calories from fat eg if a 100g food provided 100C it would want to contain 1.1g of fat, however the simple truth is what goes in minue what goes out (burnt) = weight lose or gain so f you're putting the effort in then it doesn't matter where the calories come from as at the end of the day the body is going to break them down to fuel (some foods are easier to break down than others).

whilst this only address your weight lose part of the questions, the answer to maintain energy levels is down to GI, if you want a steady suppl of energy then you need to get your body used to being "drip feed" for example an athlete will have something like 6 meals a day, these will normally consist of low GI foods containing oats, whole wheat, rice, fruits (not all fruits are low GI) as low GI foods release their energy slower into the blood stream and not affect your blood sugar levels as much as high GI foods (which cause slumps and cravings for sweet foods (often high in fat))

foods that are good for both include porridge, bananas, rice (not fried), whole wheat bread (defiantly not white), if you're looking to actually change your diet then have a look around as there's untold different plans, but find one that works for you.

Hope some of this helps.

PS allegedly caffeine is meant to help endurance too, as it's meant to slow the uptake of glycogen during exercise (this promotes the use of fat for energy) and as a result your energy stores (glycogen stored in your blood stream / muscles / liver) aren't used up as quickly (around 1500-1900 C)

[sup]*[/sup]
Calorie and calorie (C and c respectively) are measures of the same unit, C = 1000c) C and Kc are interchangeable

[sup]**[/sup]
other foods can also make you feel full, eg food high in protein (steak), licorice is meant to too

[sup]***[/sup]
the energy from alcohol is generally process after other sources
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#10
pizza base is high in carbs, not protein. Cheese both is good for protein but is fatty. Meats are best source of protein but are expensive.  I use protien shakes which if you get the banana one both looks and smells like monkey sick, its on 1/2 price offer at holland and barrett at the mo i think, mix it with milk, water or juice, it tastes ok (like a rubbish nesquik) and is good. It seems to stop me aching the next day anyway, which must be good. I've just had one mm mm
Keep it foolish...
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